Wikipedia:Today's featured list/September 5, 2022

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Locomotive on the Thamshavn Line
Locomotive on the Thamshavn Line

The first three mainline systems of the Norwegian railway network to be electrified were private ore-hauling lines. The Thamshavn Line (locomotive pictured) opened in 1909, and remained in revenue use until 1973, after which it was converted to a heritage railway. It is the world's oldest remaining alternating-current railway and the only narrow-gauge railway in the country to be electrified. It was followed by Norsk Transport's Rjukan and Tinnoset Lines two years later, and Sydvaranger's Kirkenes–Bjørnevatn Line in 1922. The Norwegian State Railways' (NSB) first electrification was parts of the Drammen Line in 1922 and the ore-hauling Ofoten Line in 1923, which connects to the Iron Ore Line in Sweden. The use of El 1 locomotives on the Drammen Line proved a large cost-saver over steam locomotives, and NSB started electrifying other lines around Oslo. During the 1940s, NSB electrified the Sørland Line, although the final section from Egersund to Stavanger was not converted until 1956. The 1950s saw the electrification of several regional and commuter lines around Oslo. (Full list...)